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Rombo BlackBlade™ (S) – Ash Wood

169,00 

Well-balanced and flexible kitchen knife optimized for outdoor cooking. With a distinctive large knife blade made of Swedish stainless steel and a handle made of ash wood, you can let yourself be inspired by the forest pantry and offer endless culinary taste experiences. Because we know, just like you, that everything tastes better outdoors!

– Easy-to-handle kitchen knife optimized for the outdoors
– Convenient to carry in the backpack
– Stylish design meets high function on the cutting board
– Elegant black knife sheath made of vegetable tanned leather that protects the knife edge from becoming dull

Only 16 left in stock

A laser engraved knife is a custom product and therefore special terms and conditions apply. Read more about it in our Terms of Service and read more about laser engraving here.

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SKU: 14086
Category: , ,

The family names that tell our story

The family names that tell our story

There has always been a strong craft tradition in Mora, thanks to the proximity to Swedish nature, rich in materials such as iron ore and timber. People from Mora have made sharp knives for the rest of the world for more than 400 years.

As long as there have been knife makers in the area, Anders and Erik have dominated men’s first names for several generations, just as Anna and Kerstin have done for the women. In fact, children were often given the same name as their parents or grandparents. When there were too many people in the same village named Anders or Anna, a family name was added before the first name.

The family name could be taken from a previous relative’s skill, an ancestor’s name, or from some geographical phenomenon. Then an Anna could be named Smids-Anna, whose ancestors were a blacksmith, or Anders could be named Sol-Anders because he came from the neighbouring island, Sollerön.

You see, these family names share a common thread throughout our history. That’s why we proudly present our new collection of wooden-handled knives. The names of which come from people who in one way or another were involved in the foundation for knife manufacturing in Mora. With the knives Finn, Wit, Lok & Rombo, we look decades back in time and note that the story of our dear Morakniv begins long before our company first saw the light of day.

There has always been a strong craft tradition in Mora, thanks to the proximity to Swedish nature, rich in materials such as iron ore and timber. People from Mora have made sharp knives for the rest of the world for more than 400 years.

As long as there have been knife makers in the area, Anders and Erik have dominated men’s first names for several generations, just as Anna and Kerstin have done for the women. In fact, children were often given the same name as their parents or grandparents. When there were too many people in the same village named Anders or Anna, a family name was added before the first name.

The family name could be taken from a previous relative’s skill, an ancestor’s name, or from some geographical phenomenon. Then an Anna could be named Smids-Anna, whose ancestors were a blacksmith, or Anders could be named Sol-Anders because he came from the neighbouring island, Sollerön.

You see, these family names share a common thread throughout our history. That’s why we proudly present our new collection of wooden-handled knives. The names of which come from people who in one way or another were involved in the foundation for knife manufacturing in Mora. With the knives Finn, Wit, Lok & Rombo, we look decades back in time and note that the story of our dear Morakniv begins long before our company first saw the light of day.

“Rombo-Anders wa knävlön tä å kutå å kund djärå
nor åv åssent.”

“Rombo-Anders wa knävlön tä å kutå å kund djärå nor åv åssent.”

Rombo-Anders was an incredible talented carver that could make something out of nothing.

Rombo-Anders was an incredible talented carver that could make something out of nothing.

The story
of Rombo

The story
of Rombo

Rombo-Anders Eriksson Ström was contemporary to the early knife manufacturers from Mora and went from being the region’s trusted shoemaker to making durable knife sheaths in volcanic fiber. However, the road to success was longer than Rombo-Anders could imagine when he was initially met with skepticism from the manufacturers. It was only when he demonstrated the advantageous economics of the new material that knife sheaths really caught on.

Rombo-Anders Eriksson Ström was contemporary to the early knife manufacturers from Mora and went from being the region’s trusted shoemaker to making durable knife sheaths in volcanic fiber. However, the road to success was longer than Rombo-Anders could imagine when he was initially met with skepticism from the manufacturers. It was only when he demonstrated the advantageous economics of the new material that knife sheaths really caught on.

The story
of Rombo

The story
of Rombo

Rombo-Anders Eriksson Ström was contemporary to the early knife manufacturers from Mora and went from being the region’s trusted shoemaker to making durable knife sheaths in volcanic fiber. However, the road to success was longer than Rombo-Anders could imagine when he was initially met with skepticism from the manufacturers. It was only when he demonstrated the advantageous economics of the new material that knife sheaths really caught on.

Rombo-Anders Eriksson Ström was contemporary to the early knife manufacturers from Mora and went from being the region’s trusted shoemaker to making durable knife sheaths in volcanic fiber. However, the road to success was longer than Rombo-Anders could imagine when he was initially met with skepticism from the manufacturers. It was only when he demonstrated the advantageous economics of the new material that knife sheaths really caught on.

From the village archive

From the village archive

“When talking about the knives from Mora, one has to mention the skilled craftsman Rombo-Anders Eriksson and his innovative mind. It was during a lunch break in the late 19th century when he noticed his son Carl’s new box made of vulcanised fibre. Instantly he saw the potential, cut a piece out, and transformed it into a knife sheath. Whether he ever replaced his son’s box is still unclear, but his life’s work and legacy live on forever.”

“When talking about the knives from Mora, one has to mention the skilled craftsman Rombo-Anders Eriksson and his innovative mind. It was during a lunch break in the late 19th century when he noticed his son Carl’s new box made of vulcanised fibre. Instantly he saw the potential, cut a piece out, and transformed it into a knife sheath. Whether he ever replaced his son’s box is still unclear, but his life’s work and legacy live on forever.”